Wednesday, May 8, 2013

Anonymous - #OpGTMO



Follow @OpGTMO on twitter for the latest updates.
#OpGTMO Information Center: http://bit.ly/Op_GTMO


Greeting Citizens of the World,

We have watched with dismay as a great injustice is being committed by the UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT in the Guantanamo Bay concentration camp.

Imagine your Father, Your Brother, Your Husband Arrested
Sold for a bounty.
Black bagged and sent away to a foreign country.
Tortured for years on end.
Accused of being a terrorist.
No trial or charge is given.
No lawyer is brought in.
No one is allowed to see him.
With no end in sight.

With no hope for justice, over 100 men who have been held and tortured for years have gone on a hunger strike. On May 18th, it will have been 100 days since they have eaten voluntarily.  Prisoners have died suddenly, violently, and suspiciously. All inmates in Guantanamo Bay have been locked in solitary confinement. Some are being force fed, an international crime. These men face the prospect of a terrible death in prison despite many of them having been cleared for release years ago. One defense attorney has already committed suicide.

It is time for the Obama administration to admit that this is a disgrace for any civilized country which upholds the rule of law. Guantanamo Bay must be closed at once, and the prisoners should be either returned to their home countries or given a fair trial in a federal court. Guantanamo Bay is an ongoing war crime. Anonymous will no longer tolerate this atrocity.

We are outraged. We, the people and Anonymous, will not allow the most expensive prison on earth to be run without any respect for international laws. We stand in solidarity with the Guantanamo hunger strikers. We will shut down Guantanamo.

On May 17 to May 19, to coincide with the 100th day of the hunger strike, we urge everyone to join global actions on the ground and hacktivist protests as well as twitterstorms, email bombs, and fax bombs, in 3 days of nonstop action.

JOIN US:

Call the White House: 202-456-1111, 202-456-1414

Call the U.S. Southern Command: 305-437-1213

Call the Department of Defense: 703-571-3343

Call your senators & representatives: http://congresslookup.com/

Sign the petition: https://www.change.org/CloseGTMO

We are Anonymous.
We are Legion.
We are Everywhere.
We do not Forgive.
We do not Forget.
Expect us.

Thursday, April 25, 2013

Anonymous - #MayDay




Greetings World.

We are Anonymous. We hereby call forth this May 1st a Global Day Of Resistance. We call upon every person in the world, every city or town, every country; Unite, rise up - and take back the public commons from the oppressors. March in your streets, occupy public space - be free and reclaim your world. And stay. Become part of a world-wide "Global Spring". From Idle No More in Canada to the pro-democracy protesters in Bahrain, on May 1st let us shake the world and the very foundations of all power and authority.

Anonymous will use all the tools at our disposal to facilitate and encourage this Global Day of Awakening. We are tired of having activists around the world hunted, jailed - and abused. We are tired of watching our own fall. And so Anonymous will stand with our freedom loving comrades all over the world and in unity raise our fist to the sky and shout: We Are Not Afraid!

We Are Anonymous.
We Are Everywhere.
We Are Legion.
We Do Not Forgive.
We Do Not Forget.
One week from today world, Expect Us.

Monday, April 22, 2013

Anonymous - CISPA Blackout || #CISPABlackout



What is CISPA?


Under the guise of cyber-security, CISPA (the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act) is a bill that would grant corporations the power to share our emails, Facebook messages, and other sensitive online data with the government - all without a warrant.

CISPA would kill online privacy as we know it - nullifying the laws that require big corporations to keep our information private from government agencies like the National Security Agency. Those corporations wouldn't have to notify you that they have done this and you wouldn't be able to take legal action against them if they made a mistake when sharing your information.

While strong information security is critical to privacy and civil liberties, CISPA does almost nothing to prevent this. All it does is give the government access to your information.

We beat CISPA last year when hundreds of thousands of Americans signed online petitions to let lawmakers know that our online privacy rights are not negotiable. But this bill is back and politicians who want the government to be able to read your emails and see what you purchase online are hoping you won�t speak out this time.

Together we can beat CISPA again!




<Code>
Feel free to use this code on your website. There are a few images that need to be downloaded and they can be downloaded below. This may require some basic knowledge of HTML and CSS.
Source Code Download:
index.htm:
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
    <head>
        <title>CISPA Blackout</title>
        <link href="style.css?v=2" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css">
        <link href='http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Noto+Sans|Roboto+Condensed|Didact+Gothic' rel='stylesheet' type='text/css'>
            <!--[if lt IE 7]>
                <style type="text/css">
                    #wrapper { height:100%; }
                </style>
            <![endif]-->
            <!--[if IE]>
                <style type="text/css">
                    #twitter {border-color:#757575;}
                    #facebook {border-color:#757575;}
                    #footer {background-color:#757575;}
                    #previewthumb:hover {border-color:#757575;}
                </style>
            <![endif]-->
    </head>
    <body>
        <div id="wrapper">
            <div id="header">
                <div id="header-title">THIS WEBSITE IS OFFLINE IN PROTEST OF CISPA</div>
            </div>
            <div id="main">
                <div class="title">
                    <p>What is CISPA?</p>
                </div>
                <div id="main-description">
                    <p>Under the guise of cyber-security, CISPA (the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act) is a bill that would grant corporations the power to share our emails, Facebook messages, and other sensitive online data with the government - all without a warrant.</p>
                    <p>CISPA would kill online privacy as we know it - nullifying the laws that require big corporations to keep our information private from government agencies like the National Security Agency. Those corporations wouldn't have to notify you that they have done this and you wouldn't be able to take legal action against them if they made a mistake when sharing your information. </p>
                    <p>While strong information security is critical to privacy and civil liberties, CISPA does almost nothing to prevent this. All it does is give the government access to your information. </p>
                    <p>We beat CISPA last year when hundreds of thousands of Americans signed online petitions to let lawmakers know that our online privacy rights are not negotiable. But this bill is back and politicians who want the government to be able to read your emails and see what you purchase online are hoping you won�t speak out this time.</p>
                    <p>Together we can beat CISPA again!</p>
                </div>
                <iframe width="700" height="425" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/i_nFyavcld4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
                <div id="main-action">
                    <div id="call-senator" class="left">
                        <p class="title">Call Your Senator!</p>
                        <a href="https://www.senate.gov/general/contact_information/senators_cfm.cfm"><img src="images/call-congress.jpg" title="Call Congress" alt="Call Congress"></a>
                        <p>One call to your senator is worth 100 signatures on a petition.</p>
                    </div>
                    <div id="sign-petition" class="right">
                        <p class="title">Sign the Petition!</p>
                        <a href="http://www.change.org/petitions/protect-internet-privacy-stop-cispa?utm_campaign=twitter_link_action_box&utm_medium=twitter&utm_source=share_petition"><img src="images/megaphone.jpg" title="Sign the Petition" alt="Petition"></a>
                        <p>Make your voice heard, let the senate know how you feel about CISPA.</p>
                    </div>
                    <div class="clear"></div>
                </div>
                <div id="main-closing">
                    <a href="http://anonyops.com/cispablackout/othersites.php">Other websites that have joined the blackout!</a>
                    <br>
                    <br>
                    <a href="http://www.cispaisback.org/">http://www.cispaisback.org/</a>
                    <br>
                    <span>#CISPABlackout</span>
                </div>
            </div>
            <div id="footer">
                <div id="footer-title">Contact: anonyops@gmail.com</div>
                <div class="left">
                    <a href="https://twitter.com/intent/user?original_referer=http%3A%2F%2Flocalhost%2FAnonyops%2F®ion=following&screen_name=AnonyOps_&source=followbutton&variant=1.1"><img title="Follow us on Twitter!" alt="Twitter" id="twitter" src="images/twitter-big.png"></a> <!-- You can change the link to your personal twitter if you want to. Or you can delete the code for the image itself. !-->
                    <a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Anonyops/119328501493033"><img title="Like us on Facebook!" alt="Facebook" id="facebook" src="images/facebook-big.png"></a> <!-- You can change the link to your personal Facebook if you want to. Or you can delete the code for the image itself. !-->
                    <a href="https://www.eff.org/cybersecurity-bill-faq"><img title="Learn More" alt="Learn more" id="learnmore" src="images/cispa.jpg"></a>
                    <a href="http://www.change.org/petitions/protect-internet-privacy-stop-cispa?utm_campaign=twitter_link_action_box&utm_medium=twitter&utm_source=share_petition"><img title="Sign the Petition" alt="Man on Megaphone" id="makeyourvoiceheard" src="images/make_your_voice_heard.png"></a>
                    <div class="clear"></div>
                </div>
                <div class="right">
                    <a href="http://anonyops.com/cispablackout/code.php"><img title="Get The Code!" alt="Get The Code!" id="previewthumb" src="images/cispa_blackout_thumbnail.jpg"></a>
                    <img id="getcode" src="images/get_code.png">
                </div>
            </div>
        </div>
    </body>
</html>

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

style.css:

body
{
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
    height: 100%;
}

a
{
    color: #26B7FF;
}

a:hover
{
    text-decoration: none;
}

#wrapper
{
    min-height: 100%;
    min-width: 1150px;
    position: relative;
}

#header
{
    background-image: url('images/blackorchid.png');
    width: 100%;
    height: 100px;
    text-align: center;
    border-bottom: solid 2px red;
}

#header-title
{
    padding: 5px;
    padding-top: 15px;
    color: red;
    font-size: 50px;
    font-family: 'Roboto Condensed', sans-serif;
    font-weight: bold;
}

#main
{
    min-height: 700px;
    font-family: 'Noto Sans', sans-serif;
    text-align: center;
    width: 100%;
    padding-bottom: 184px;    /* = padding-bottom for this element MUST be the same as the height of the footer element = */
}

#main .title
{
    font-size: 30px;
    font-family: 'Didact Gothic', sans-serif;
}

#main-description
{
    padding: 5px;
    font-size: 18px;
}

#main-action
{
    margin: 0px 11% 0px 11%;
    padding: 20px;
}

#main-action img
{
    padding: 5px;
    border: solid 1px #A9A9A9;
    -webkit-border-radius: 6px;
    -moz-border-radius: 6px;
    border-radius: 6px;
}

#main-action #call-senator
{
    width: 400px;
}

#main-action #sign-petition
{
    width: 400px;
}

#main-closing
{
    padding: 20px;
    font-size: 15px;
    font-style: bold;
}

#footer
{
    position: absolute;
    bottom: 0;
    left: 0;
    background-color: grey;
    border-top: solid 1px #A9A9A9;
    font-family: 'Noto Sans', sans-serif;
    height: 186px;
    width: 100%;
}

#footer-title
{
    padding: 5px;
    text-align: center;
    font-weight: bold;
}

#footer img
{
    border: none;
}

#getcode
{
    padding: 15px;
    margin-bottom: 20px;
}

#twitter
{
    border-color: grey;
    padding: 5px;
    width: 120px;
    height: 120px;
}

#twitter:hover
{
    opacity: 0.5;
}

#facebook
{
    padding: 5px;
    width: 120px;
    height: 120px;
}

#facebook:hover
{
    opacity: 0.5;
}

#previewthumb
{
    padding: 5px;
    width: 200px;
    height: 120px;
}

#previewthumb:hover
{
    opacity: 0.5;
}

#learnmore
{
    margin-left: 20px;
    padding: 5px;
    width: 200px;
    height: 120px;
}

#learnmore:hover
{
    opacity: 0.5;
}

#makeyourvoiceheard
{
    margin: 0px 30px 0px 30px;
    padding: 2px;
    width: 100px;
    height: 145px;
}

#makeyourvoiceheard:hover
{
    opacity: 0.5;
}

#code-box
{
    padding: 5px;
    font-size: 15px;
    font-family: 'Corbel';
}

.left
{
    float: left;
}

.right
{
    float: right;
}

.clear
{
    clear: both;
}

Do not bother copying code.php onto your own server unless you are experienced with php. Have it link back to here instead.
If you do not want to replace your index.html file (which I DO NOT recommend) then simply use the code below to redirect your homepage.

meta HTTP-EQUIV="REFRESH" content="0; url=http://www.yourdomain.com/cispablackoutfolder"

 ======================================================================================
 ======================================================================================
    ===== #CISPABlackout Webpage =====
    ===== By @Ultimate_Hackz =====
    This is my shutdown page for my website. Here is all the coding below.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    (SAVE THIS AS "index.html" NO QUOTES)
    <html>
    <head>
    <title>#CispaBlackout</title>
    <embed src="Afraid of this Generation.mp3" autostart="true" width="0" height="0">
    <script type="text/javascript" src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.4.2/jquery.min.js"></script>
    <style type="text/css">
            body {
                    background-color: #000
            }
            #console {
                    font-family: courier, monospace;
                    color: #fff;
                    width:750px;
                    margin-left:auto;
                    margin-right:auto;
                    margin-top:100px;
                    font-size:14px;
            }
            a {
                    color: #0bc;
                    text-decoration: none;
            }
            #a {
                    color: #0f0;
            }
            #c {
                    color: #0bc;
            }
            #b {
                    color: #ff0096;
            }
    </style>
    </head>
    <body>
    <script type="text/javascript">
            var Typer={
            text: null,
            accessCountimer:null,
            index:0, // current cursor position
            speed:2, // speed of the Typer
            file:"", //file, must be setted
            accessCount:0, //times alt is pressed for Access Granted
            deniedCount:0, //times caps is pressed for Access Denied
            init: function(){// inizialize Hacker Typer
                    accessCountimer=setInterval(function(){Typer.updLstChr();},500); // inizialize timer for blinking cursor
                    $.get(Typer.file,function(data){// get the text file
                            Typer.text=data;// save the textfile in Typer.text
                            Typer.text = Typer.text.slice(0, Typer.text.length-1);
                    });
            },
            content:function(){
                    return $("#console").html();// get console content
            },
            write:function(str){// append to console content
                    $("#console").append(str);
                    return false;
            },
            makeAccess:function(){//create Access Granted popUp      FIXME: popup is on top of the page and doesn't show is the page is scrolled
                    Typer.hidepop(); // hide all popups
                    Typer.accessCount=0; //reset count
                    var ddiv=$("<div id='gran'>").html(""); // create new blank div and id "gran"
                    ddiv.addClass("accessGranted"); // add class to the div
                    ddiv.html("<h1>ACCESS GRANTED</h1>"); // set content of div
                    $(document.body).prepend(ddiv); // prepend div to body
                    return false;
            },
            makeDenied:function(){//create Access Denied popUp      FIXME: popup is on top of the page and doesn't show is the page is scrolled
                    Typer.hidepop(); // hide all popups
                    Typer.deniedCount=0; //reset count
                    var ddiv=$("<div id='deni'>").html(""); // create new blank div and id "deni"
                    ddiv.addClass("accessDenied");// add class to the div
                    ddiv.html("<h1>ACCESS DENIED</h1>");// set content of div
                    $(document.body).prepend(ddiv);// prepend div to body
                    return false;
            },
            hidepop:function(){// remove all existing popups
                    $("#deni").remove();
                    $("#gran").remove();
            },
            addText:function(key){//Main function to add the code
                    if(key.keyCode==18){// key 18 = alt key
                            Typer.accessCount++; //increase counter
                            if(Typer.accessCount>=3){// if it's presed 3 times
                                    Typer.makeAccess(); // make access popup
                            }
                    }else if(key.keyCode==20){// key 20 = caps lock
                            Typer.deniedCount++; // increase counter
                            if(Typer.deniedCount>=3){ // if it's pressed 3 times
                                    Typer.makeDenied(); // make denied popup
                            }
                    }else if(key.keyCode==27){ // key 27 = esc key
                            Typer.hidepop(); // hide all popups
                    }else if(Typer.text){ // otherway if text is loaded
                            var cont=Typer.content(); // get the console content
                            if(cont.substring(cont.length-1,cont.length)=="|") // if the last char is the blinking cursor
                                    $("#console").html($("#console").html().substring(0,cont.length-1)); // remove it before adding the text
                            if(key.keyCode!=8){ // if key is not backspace
                                    Typer.index+=Typer.speed;       // add to the index the speed
                            }else{
                                    if(Typer.index>0) // else if index is not less than 0
                                            Typer.index-=Typer.speed;//     remove speed for deleting text
                            }
                            var text=Typer.text.substring(0,Typer.index)// parse the text for stripping html enities
                            var rtn= new RegExp("\n", "g"); // newline regex
           
                            $("#console").html(text.replace(rtn,"<br/>"));// replace newline chars with br, tabs with 4 space and blanks with an html blank
                            window.scrollBy(0,50); // scroll to make sure bottom is always visible
                    }
                    if ( key.preventDefault && key.keyCode != 122 ) { // prevent F11(fullscreen) from being blocked
                            key.preventDefault()
                    };  
                    if(key.keyCode != 122){ // otherway prevent keys default behavior
                            key.returnValue = false;
                    }
            },
            updLstChr:function(){ // blinking cursor
                    var cont=this.content(); // get console
                    if(cont.substring(cont.length-1,cont.length)=="|") // if last char is the cursor
                            $("#console").html($("#console").html().substring(0,cont.length-1)); // remove it
                    else
                            this.write("|"); // else write it
            }
    }
    function replaceUrls(text) {
            var http = text.indexOf("http://");
            var space = text.indexOf(".me ", http);
            if (space != -1) {
                    var url = text.slice(http, space-1);
                    return text.replace(url, "<a href=\""  + url + "\">" + url + "</a>");
            } else {
            return text
    }
    }
    Typer.speed=3;
    Typer.file="blackout.txt";
    Typer.init();
    var timer = setInterval("t();", 30);
    function t() {
            Typer.addText({"keyCode": 123748});
            if (Typer.index > Typer.text.length) {
                    clearInterval(timer);
            }
    }
    </script>
    <div id="console"></div>
    <script type="text/javascript">
      var _gaq = _gaq || [];
      _gaq.push(['_setAccount', 'UA-610661-7']);
      _gaq.push(['_trackPageview']);
      (function() {
        var ga = document.createElement('script'); ga.type = 'text/javascript'; ga.async = true;
        ga.src = ('https:' == document.location.protocol ? 'https://ssl' : 'http://www') + '.google-analytics.com/ga.js';
        var s = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(ga, s);
      })();
    </script>
    <script language=JavaScript>
        <!--
        //Disable right mouse click Script
        //FUCKCISPA
        //END IT NOW
        var message="#CispaBlackout";
        ///////////////////////////////////
        function clickIE4(){
        if (event.button==2){
        alert(none);
        return false;
        }
        }
        function clickNS4(e){
        if (document.layers||document.getElementById&&!document.all){
        if (e.which==2||e.which==3){
        alert(message);
        return false;
        }
        }
        }
        if (document.layers){
        document.captureEvents(Event.MOUSEDOWN);
        document.onmousedown=clickNS4;
        }
        else if (document.all&&!document.getElementById){
        document.onmousedown=clickIE4;
        }
        document.oncontextmenu=new Function("alert(message);return false")
        // -->
        </script>
    </body>
    </html>
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    (SAVE THIS AS "blackout.txt" NO QUOTES)
    <span id="a">#CispaBlackout</span>:<span id="b">~</span><span id="c">$</span> root blackout.txt<br/><br/>
    Welcome internet.<!-- laglaglaglaglaglaglaglaglaglaglaglag --><p>This is a website shutdown in response to the Cispa Blackout.</p><!-- qowifjqwoeijfoqweijfqweoifjqweofijqweoqwoijefoqwijefoijfqiwoefjj -->
    <p>Some info on #CispaBlackout <a href="http://huff.to/104m34S">Here</a>.</p><!- oqwipjefqwioefjwioqfjoiqwjfeioqwjefoi -->
    <p>This was an Anonymous call to protest Cispa.</p><!-- owlsqweoifjqwoefijqwoeifjqwoefijwef -->
    If you own a website or know somebody who does, please contact them and tell them to shut it down in response to the Cispa Blackout.<!-- slightdelayhere--> Even call your favorite websites and ask for a shutdown.<!-- longlongcomment --> Ask websites <a href="http://www.seomoz.org/top500">like these</a> to take down their sites.
    <p><!-- littlelag --!><a href="http://1.usa.gov/HeI7d ">Click Here</a> for a list of senators and contact to tell them to vote NO on Cispa</p>
    <p>We are Anonymous.<!-- EndCipsaYouFuckingGovernment--> We are legion.<!-- EndCipsaYouFuckingGovernment--> We do not forgive.<!-- EndCipsaYouFuckingGovernment--> We do not forget.<!-- EndCipsaYouFuckingGovernment--> Expect us.</p>
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    That is all. Upload both to you website. If you want to see my site here you go http://www.V3CT0RAnon.tk

How to join today's April 22 CISPA protest

The proposed Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA) heads to the Senate this week for a vote. Today, April 22, has been declared a day of protest.
As of this writing, around 400 websites have gone dark for the "CISPA Blackout." #StopCISPA is trending at #7 on Twitter.
Nearly 165,000 people have signed the Protect Internet Privacy: Stop CISPA petition. Over 827,000 people have signed the global Stop CISPA petition ("Save the Internet from the U.S.").
STOP CISPA
Effectively, CISPA is a blank check for the U.S. Federal Government to perform search and seizure without a warrant, without individuals ever knowing their data was taken and then, well, passed around.
It has been recently learned that CISPA would allow a large range of Federal agencies - including Immigration, the TSA, Homeland Security, FBI and the DoJ, to quietly access our data from sites ranging from Facebook and Google to Apple, Amazon, and more. CISPA would protect the companies - but not the people.
The cumulative effect of watching this Act rise up after SOPA and PIPA, fail, yet return with blatant disregard for American citizens' rights while the U.S. Government fails to adequately protect the citizen data it already has... Many people feel helpless, angry, and are wondering what they can do - if anything.
Because CISPA is now widely regarded as deeply flawed and reeks of well-publicized corruption, many organizations, websites, companies and individuals are joining in today's protest - initially called and fueled by hacktivist entity Anonymous.
Here's how to add your voice to the protest, with a variety of commitment levels.
  • On Facebook: change your icon to the STOP CISPA image, share articles about CISPA, and resource pages for those friends who want to join in.

Monday, April 15, 2013

No Warrant, No Problem: How The Government Can Still Get Your Digital Data

The U.S. government isn’t allowed to wiretap American citizens without a warrant from a judge. But there are plenty of legal ways for law enforcement, from the local sheriff to the FBI to the Internal Revenue Service, to snoop on the digital trails you create every day. Authorities can often obtain your emails and texts by going to Google or AT&T with a simple subpoena. Usually you won’t even be notified.
Two senators introduced legislation last month to update privacy protection for emails, but the bill remains in committee. Meantime, here’s how law enforcement can track you without a warrant now:
phone-records

PHONE RECORDS: Who You Called, When You Called
Listening to your phone calls without a judge’s warrant is illegal if you’re a U.S. citizen. But police don’t need a warrant — which requires showing “probable cause” of a crime — to get just the numbers you called and when you called them, as well as incoming calls, from phone carriers. Instead, police can get courts to sign off on a subpoena, which only requires that the data they’re after is relevant to an investigation — a lesser standard of evidence.
Police can get phone records without a warrant thanks toSmith v. Maryland, a Supreme Court ruling in 1979, which found that the Constitution’s Fourth Amendment protection against unreasonable search and seizure doesn’t apply to a list of phone numbers. The New York Times reported last week that the New York’s police department “has quietly amassed a trove” of call records by routinely issuing subpoenas for them from phones that had been reported stolen. According to The Times, the records “could conceivably be used for any investigative purpose.”
location-data

LOCATION DATA: Your Phone Is a Tracker
Many cell phone carriers provide authorities with a phone’s location and may charge a fee for doing so. Cell towers track where your phone is at any moment; so can the GPS features in some smartphones. The major cell carriers, including Verizon and AT&T, responded to at least 1.3 million law enforcement requests for cell phone locations, text messages and other data in 2011. Internet service providers can also provide location data that tracks users via their computer’s IP address — a unique number assigned to each computer.
Many courts have ruled that police don’t need a warrant from a judge to get cell phone location data. They only have to show that, under the federal Electronic Communications Privacy Act (EPCA), the data contains “specific and articulable facts” related to an investigation — again, a lesser standard than probable cause.Delaware, Maryland and Oklahoma have proposed laws that would require police to obtain a warrant for location data; Gov. Jerry Brown of California, a Democrat, vetoed a similar bill last September. Last year, the Senate Judiciary Committee approved a bill championed by Sen. Patrick Leahy, a Vermont Democrat, which would have updated the ECPA but wouldn’t have changed how location data was treated. Leahy and Sen. Mike Lee, a Utah Republican, introduced a similar bill last month, which remains in committee. Rep. Zoe Lofgren, a California Democrat, introduced a separate bill in the House of Representatives last month that would require a warrant for location data as well as emails.
ip-addresses
IP ADDRESSES: What Computers You Used
Google, Yahoo, Microsoft and other webmail providers accumulate massive amounts of data about our digital wanderings. A warrant is needed for access to some emails (see below), but not for the IP addresses of the computers used to log into your mail account or surf the Web. According to the American Civil Liberties Union, those records are kept for at least a year.
Police can thank U.S. v. Forrester, a case involving two men trying to set up a drug lab in California, for the ease of access. In the 2007 case, the government successfully argued that tracking IP addresses was no different than installing a device to track every telephone number dialed by a given phone (which is legal). Police only need a court to sign off on a subpoena certifying that the data they’re after is relevant to an investigation — the same standard as for cell phone records.
emails
EMAILS: Messages You Sent Months Ago
There’s a double standard when it comes to email, one of the most requested types of data. A warrant is needed to get recent emails, but law enforcement can obtain older ones with only a subpoena. Google says it received16,407 requests for data — including emails sent through its Gmail service — from U.S. law enforcement in 2012. And Microsoft, with its Outlook email service, disclosed last month that it had received 11,073 requests for data last year. Other email providers, such as Yahoo, have not made similar statistics available. In January, Googlesaid that it would lobby in favor of greater protections for email.
This is another area where the ECPA comes into play. The law gives greater protection to recent messages than older ones, using a 180-day cutoff. Only a subpoena is required for emails older than that; otherwise, a warrant is necessary. This extends to authorities beyond the FBI and the police. I.R.S. documents released this week by the American Civil Liberties Union suggest that the I.R.S.’ Criminal Tax Division reads emails without obtaining a warrant. The bills introduced by Leahy and Lee in the Senate and Lofgren in the House would require a warrant for the authorities to get all emails regardless of age. The Justice Department, which had objected to such a change, said last month that it doesn’t any longer.
email-drafts

EMAIL DRAFTS: Drafts Are Different
Communicating through draft emails, à la David Petreaus and Paula Broadwell, seems sneaky. But drafts are actually easier for investigators to get than recently sent emails because the law treats them differently.
The ECPA distinguishes between communications — emails, texts, etc. — and stored electronic data. Draft emails fall into the latter, which get less protection under the law. Authorities need only a subpoena for them. The bills introduced by Leahy and Lee in the Senate and Lofgren in the House would change that by requiring a warrant to obtain email drafts.
text-messages

TEXT MESSAGES: As With Emails, So With Texts
Investigators need only a subpoena, not a warrant, to get text messages more than 180 days old from a cell provider — the same standard as emails. Many carriers charge authorities a fee to provide texts and other information. For texts, Sprint charges $30, for example, while Verizon charges $50.
The ECPA also applies to text messages, according to Hanni Fakhoury, a lawyer with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, which is why the rules are similar to those governing emails. But the ECPA doesn’t apply when it comes to actually reading texts on someone’s phone rather than getting them from a carrier. State courts havesplit on the issue. Ohio’s Supreme Court has ruled thatpolice need a warrant to view the contents of cell phones of people who’ve been arrested, including texts. But the California Supreme Court has said no warrant is needed. The U.S. Supreme Court in 2010 declined to clear up the matter.
cloud-data

CLOUD DATA: Documents, Photos, and Other Stuff Stored Online
Authorities typically need only a subpoena to get data from Google Drive, Dropbox, SkyDrive, and other services that allow users to store data on their servers, or “in the cloud,” as it’s known.
The law treats cloud data the same as draft emails — authorities don’t need a warrant to get it. But files that you’ve shared with others — say, a collaboration using Google Docs — might require a warrant under the ECPA if it’s considered “communication” rather than stored data. “That’s a very hard rule to apply,” says Greg Nojeim, a senior counsel with the Center for Democracy & Technology. “It actually makes no sense for the way we communicate today.”
social-media

SOCIAL MEDIA: The New Privacy Frontier
When it comes to sites like Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn, the social networks’ privacy policies dictate how cooperative they are in handing over users’ data. Facebook says it requires a warrant from a judge to disclose a user’s “messages, photos, videos, wall posts, and location information.” But it will supply basic information, such as a user’s email address or the IP addresses of the computers from which someone recently accessed an account, under a subpoena. Twitter reported in July that it had received 679 requests for user information from U.S. authorities during the first six months of 2012. Twitter says that “non-public information about Twitter users is not released except as lawfully required by appropriate legal process such as a subpoena, court order, or other valid legal process.”
Courts haven’t issued a definitive ruling on social media. In September, a Manhattan Criminal Court judge upheld a prosecutor’s subpoena for information from Twitter about an Occupy Wall Street protester arrested on the Brooklyn Bridge in 2011. It was the first time a judge had allowed prosecutors to use a subpoena to get information from Twitter rather than forcing them to get a warrant; the case is ongoing.

Via ProPublica

Anonymous - A Better World is Possible (#OpAwakeTheMasses)

Anonymous - In a attempt to open the eyes of the people of the world.     



Replacing their brainwashing weapons with the truth is the most peaceful action we will ever be able to take. And the most important fact is that it can be done by anyone, because anyone can be Anonymous. Let's remind them that we're not helpless no matter what threats or acts of violence they take.

We are Anonymous.
We are everywhere.
We are everyone.
We will direct humanity into the right path.
We will save humanity - because we can.
Greedy banksters and corporate cartels, you cannot stop us.
You cannot stop the future.
Expect us.

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